She wrote articles for newspapers and magazines, and then, after taking a night course at the New School in Manhattan, wrote for the CBS shows “Kate & Allie,” “Everything’s Relative”

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She wrote articles for newspapers and magazines, and then, after taking a night course at the New School in Manhattan, wrote for the CBS shows “Kate & Allie,” “Everything’s Relative”
and “Designing Women”; published a novel titled “Liberated Lady” (1986) (which was a Literary Guild alternate selection); and wrote a semiautobiographical play about a sitcom writer whose mother develops Alzheimer’s.
Trish Vradenburg, Crusader Against Alzheimer’s, Dies at 70 –
By SAM ROBERTSAPRIL 19, 2017
After her mother slipped into dementia in the late 1980s
and died of complications of Alzheimer’s disease in 1992 at 76, Trish Vradenburg and her husband, George, committed themselves to finding a remedy.
“Yesterday’s dream is today’s reality.”
A version of this article appears in print on April 20, 2017, on Page B15 of the New York
edition with the headline: Trish Vradenburg, 70, Crusader Against Alzheimer’s Disease.
“A cure for Alzheimer’s: a fantasy, a wish, an impossible dream; the same words
that were said to Galileo, Edison, Curie, Salk and whoever dreamed up the internet,” she wrote.
They raised millions of dollars for research and eventually established their own organization, UsAgainstAlzheimer’s, to galvanize their corporate
and show-business connections into generating greater public awareness of the disease and advocating for more federal government investment in experimentation, speedier development of drugs and improved patient care.

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